Life On Mars (US Soundtrack)

In 2012, a friend suggested I check out the short-lived US TV show Life On Mars. It's a cop show, originally set in 2008. However, the main character (Sam Tyler) is hit by a car and wakes up in 1973. The rest of the show mixes the usual "case of the week" with Sam trying to figure out what he's doing in 1973 and trying to deal with police work without the 2008 technology (and policies) that he's used to. The US version lasted less than one season, but they did wrap the story and explain what happened to Sam. It's based on a UK show of the same name, but the two versions have very different resolutions. I've only watched the US version so far (and loved it) - really need to check out the UK original.

So anyway, part of the appeal of Life On Mars to me was the killer soundtrack. Liked it so much I made this "mix" with most of the songs from the show. I didn't include the initial song ("Ground Zero" by Chris Cornell) because that's from 2008, before Sam's accident. I skipped a couple of others that didn't grab me, or just didn't fit the flow of the mix. Example: The original "Somewhere Over The Rainbow" is used in the show, but didn't seem to fit the vibe of the mix.

You can listen on 8tracks.com.

DISC 1:

From episode 1 - Out Here In The Fields:

  1. David Bowie - "Life On Mars?" (1971)
    written by David Bowie, taken from the album Hunky Dory
  2. Five Man Electrical Band - "Signs" (1970)
    written by Les Emmerson, taken from the single Signs
  3. The Who - "Baba O'Riley" (1971)
    written by Pete Townshend, taken from the album Who's Next
  4. The Sweet - "Little Willy" (1973)
    written by Nicky Chinn and Mike Chapman, taken from the album The Sweet
  5. The Rolling Stones - "Out Of Time" (1966)
    written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, taken from the album Aftermath

From episode 2 - The Real Adventures Of The Unreal Sam Tyler:

  1. Mott The Hoople - "All The Way From Memphis" (1973)
    written by Ian Hunter, taken from the album Mott
  2. Gilbert O'Sullivan - "Get Down" (1973)
    written by Gilbert O'Sullivan, taken from the album I'm A Writer, Not A Fighter
  3. Simon & Garfunkel - "I Am A Rock" (1966)
    written by Paul Simon, taken from the album Sounds Of Silence

From episode 3 - My Maharishi Is Bigger Than Your Maharishi:

  1. Tommy James & The Shondells - "Sweet Cherry Wine" (1969)
    written by Richard Grasso and Tommy James, taken from the album Cellophane Symphony
  2. Dusty Springfield - "Just A Little Lovin'" (1969)
    written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, taken from the album Dusty In Memphis
  3. The Marmalade - "Reflections Of My Life" (1969)
    written by Junior Campbell and Dean Ford, taken from the single Reflections Of My Life

From episode 4 - Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadows?:

  1. Paul Simon - "Mother And Child Reunion" (1971)
    written by Paul Simon, taken from the album Paul Simon
  2. The Velvet Underground - "Rock & Roll" (1970)
    written by Lou Reed, taken from the album Loaded
  3. T. Rex - "Bang A Gong (Get It On)" (1971)
    written by Marc Bolan, taken from the album Electric Warrior
  4. The Kinks - "20th Century Man" (1971)
    written by Ray Davies, taken from the album Muswell Hillbillies
  5. The Hollies - "Long Cool Woman (In A Black Dress)" (1971)
    written by Allan Clarke, Roger Cook, and Roger Greenaway, taken from the album Distant Light
  6. The Beach Boys - "Long Promised Road" (1971)
    written by Carl Wilson and Jack Rieley, taken from the album Surf's Up

DISC 2:

From episode 5 - Things To Do In New York When You Think You're Dead:

  1. Garland Jeffreys - "Wild In The Streets" (1973)
    written by Garland Jeffreys, taken from the single Wild In The Streets
  2. Kool Blues - "I'm Going To Keep On Loving You" (1972)
    written by William Gilbert, Norman Whiteside, and John Primm, taken from the compilation album Eccentric Soul: The Capsoul Label
  3. Sly And The Family Stone - "Everybody Is A Star" (1969)
    written by Sly Stone, taken from the album Greatest Hits
  4. Three Dog Night - "Black And White" (1972)
    written by David I. Arkin and Earl Robinson, taken from the album Seven Separate Fools

From episode 6 - Tuesday's Dead:

  1. Grand Funk Railroad - "We're An American Band" (1973)
    written by Don Brewer, taken from the album We're An American Band
  2. Cat Stevens - "Tuesday's Dead" (1971)
    written by Cat Stevens, taken from the album Teaser And The Firecat

From episode 7 - The Man Who Sold The World:

  1. Bread - "Everything I Own" (1972)
    written by David Gates, taken from the album Baby I'm-A Want You
  2. Steely Dan - "Reelin' In The Years" (1972)
    written by Walter Becker and Donald Fagen, taken from the album Can't Buy A Thrill
  3. Harry Nilsson - "Spaceman" (1972)
    written by Harry Nilsson, taken from the album Son Of Schmilsson

From episode 8 - Take A Look At The Lawmen:

  1. The Guess Who - "No Time" (1970)
    written by Randy Bachman and Burton Cummings, taken from the album Canned Wheat
  2. Thin Lizzy - "Whiskey In The Jar" (1973)
    written by traditional, taken from the single Whiskey In The Jar
  3. B.W. Stevenson - "My Maria" (1973)
    written by B.W. Stevenson and Daniel Moore, taken from the album My Maria

From episode 9 - The Dark Side Of The Mook:

  1. Cream - "White Room" (1968)
    written by Jack Bruce and Pete Brown, taken from the album Wheels Of Fire
  2. Humble Pie - "30 Days In The Hole" (1972)
    written by Steve Marriott, taken from the album Smokin'

From episode 10 - Let All The Children Boogie:

  1. The Action - "Look At The View" (1968)
    written by Mike "Ace" Evans, taken from the album Brain/Rolled Gold
  2. Traffic Sound - "Yesterday's Game" (1970)
    written by Willy Barclay and Manuel Sanguinetti, taken from the album Traffic Sound
  3. David Bowie - "Starman" (1972)
    written by David Bowie, taken from the album The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars
  4. The Kinks - "Supersonic Rocket Ship" (1972)
    written by Ray Davies, taken from the album Everybody's In Show-Biz

DISC 3:

From episode 11 - Home Is Where You Hang Your Holster:

  1. The Sweet - "The Ballroom Blitz" (1973)
    written by Nicky Chinn and Mike Chapman, taken from the album Desolation Boulevard

From episode 12 - The Simple Secret Of The Note In Us All:

  1. Ringo Starr - "It Don't Come Easy" (1971)
    written by Richard Starkey, taken from the single It Don't Come Easy
  2. Traffic Sound - "Lux" (1971)
    written by Willy Barclay, Jean Pierre Magnet, Luis Nevares, Freddy Rizo-Patrón, Manuel Sanguinetti, and Willy Thorne, taken from the album Lux
  3. The Moody Blues - "Isn't Life Strange" (1972)
    written by John Lodge, taken from the album Seventh Sojourn

From episode 13 - Revenge Of Broken Jaw:

  1. Elton John - "Rocket Man (I Think It's Going To Be A Long Long Time)" (1972)
    written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin, taken from the album Honky Château
  2. The Moody Blues - "Go Now" (1965)
    written by Larry Banks and Milton Bennett, taken from the album The Magnificent Moodies

From episode 14 - Coffee, Tea or Annie:

  1. Simon & Garfunkel - "Fakin' It" (1968)
    written by Paul Simon, taken from the album Bookends
  2. Shocking Blue - "Venus" (1969)
    written by Robbie van Leeuwen, taken from the album At Home
  3. The Partridge Family - "Point Me In The Direction Of Albuquerque" (1970)
    written by Tony Romeo, taken from the album The Partridge Family Album

From episode 15 - All the Young Dudes:

  1. Jim Croce - "You Don't Mess Around With Jim" (1972)
    written by Jim Croce, taken from the album You Don't Mess Around With Jim
  2. Mott The Hoople - "All The Young Dudes" (1972)
    written by David Bowie, taken from the album All The Young Dudes

From episode 16 - Everyone Knows It's Windy:

  1. Lou Reed - "Satellite Of Love" (1972)
    written by Lou Reed, taken from the album Transformer
  2. Raspberries - "Go All The Way" (1972)
    written by Eric Carmen, taken from the album Raspberries
  3. The Association - "Windy" (1967)
    written by Ruthann Friedman, taken from the album Insight Out

From episode 17 - Life Is a Rock:

  1. Reunion - "Life Is A Rock (But The Radio Rolled Me)" (1974)
    written by Norman Dolph, taken from the single Life Is A Rock (But The Radio Rolled Me)
  2. Elton John - "Mona Lisas And Mad Hatters" (1972)
    written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin, taken from the album Honky Château

Hope you enjoyed the mix, and go check out Life On Mars!

Back to Owen's Mix CD Page